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In This Issue

February 17th, 2020
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- Sea Courses:
Western Mediterranean Cruise

- The Unlikely Smuggler

- Featured Article: Here's what coronavirus does to the body

- VestaPay

- PhysicianCrossroads.com

- Wounded Warrior Project

- Mercy Ships: Volunteers Needed

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9 Night Western Mediterranean CME Cruise

May 26th—June 4th, 2020

Western Mediterranean

This course is designed for family physicians, specialists, and allied health care professionals. The aim is to provide evidence-based material, as well as practical and relevant clinical pearls that will be easy to implement into one’s own medical practice. Conference attendees will be invited to complete a pre-course Needs Assessment to assist the faculty with the development of their presentations.

Faculty

Dr. Vivien Brown
Specialty: Family Medicine & Vaccines

Dr. Peter Lin
Specialty: Primary Care


Sea Courses: Kotor, Montenegro (Western Mediterranean)

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The Unlikely Smuggler

The Unlikely Smuggler: An Autobiography by John Paju C.R.N.A

A CRNA who’s life story includes childhood miracles, humorous times, touching experiences, Bible smuggling, and many adventures. From becoming a medic in the Air Force and then eventually a CRNA his adventures impact the lives of many throughout his life. He assisted in the unveiling of the “People’s Temple” deception prior to the “Jonestown Massacre.” He smuggled forbidden bibles and studies to underground Christians behind the lines of communist China and Russia. Then he takes all these adventurous stories to the youth at Juvenile Hall to show them positive life changing possibilities within their own lives.

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This photo taken on February 3, 2020 shows a doctor looking at a lung CT scan while making his rounds at a ward of a quarantine zone in Wuhan, the epicenter of the novel coronavirus outbreak, in China's central Hubei Province. The number of total infections has surpassed 64,000 globally as of February 14. // Photograph by STR/AFP Via Getty Images

Here’s what coronavirus does to the body

From blood storms to honeycomb lungs, here’s an organ-by-organ look at how COVID-19 harms humans.

Much remains unknown about the novel coronavirus ripping through China, but one thing is certain. The disease can cast a storm over the whole human body.

Such has been the nature of past zoonotic coronaviruses, ones that hopped from animals to humans like SARS and MERS. Unlike their common-cold-causing cousins, these emergent coronaviruses can spark a viral-induced fire throughout many of a person’s organs, and the new disease—dubbed “COVID-19” by the World Health Organization on Tuesday—is no exception when it is severe. […]

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VestaCare

If there is one common theme that separates VestaPay from all of the other RCM vendors it is our focus and ability to secure 100% of the patients’ known and unknown liability at time of service. Recovery Cash Management Services

All other vendors, including those touting automated payment plan, fail to address solving the patient payment problem because they continue to follow the current and highly flawed approach of “Chasing” the patient after the statement is generated and the final balance owed is determined. This typically occurs 30-120 days after the treatment date or Time of Service (TOS). It is a particularly acute problem for the Emergency Department, where most hospitals attribute 40-45% of their patient revenue losses.

By focusing on the TOS and avoiding chasing patients, VestaPay revamps this approach. However, it is our core technologies that allow us to be successful in working at the TOS, specifically our Dynamic Balance Adjusting AutoPay plans. Utilizing our Dynamic Balance Adjusting AutoPay plans hospitals can engage patients using a simple estimate at TOS, and secure 100% of the final balance the patient owes.

With the restrictions created by EMTALA, hospitals can’t discuss charges and payments until the patients have been medically screened. And, you can’t have financial counselors questioning the clinical staff about the procedures performed in order to generate an estimate. Further most hospitals have unrestricted patient flow, meaning patients can simply walk out the front door after treatment, by-passing the ED registration desks. How VestaPay addresses all of these problems directly and effectively is what has allowed us to prove success in the ED.

ED Patient Payment and Revenue Management

Securing patient revenue in the ED has typically been challenging for all hospitals and is the source of the largest patient revenue losses. Addressing this problem is compounded by EMTALA regulations limiting financial discussions with patients until after clinical treatment has been rendered. And, many hospitals’ “Exit-door” flow enables patients to simply walk out without rechecking at the registration desks, further undermining attempts to collect payment from patients at time of service.

It is so easy for readers to assume we mean collections, offering auto payment plans, and that we chase the patients that I am generally over stressing the points about our DBA AutoPay plans and our Time-of-Service deployment.

These three things: Advanced Estimating, DBA AutoPay plans and time of service engagement are the primary reasons we are out-performing competition 10 to 1.

Challenges:

  • 40-45% of Total Hospital Bad Debt is ED related
  • EMTALA restrictions prevent patient engagement at check-in
  • Physical floor layout limits patient re-check at discharge
  • Even “advanced” estimators are ineffective
  • Patients frequently arrive at the ED without a method of payment

Opportunities:

  • Engage the patient in the clinical area after EMTALA cleared
  • Use of tiered estimates require minimal clinician disruption
  • Dynamic Balance Adjusting AutoPay plans ensure affordability
  • Charity care options secured vs patient default to bad debt
  • Implementing the ED builds support for the full hospital roll-out.
  • Active patient communication management
  • Secures and prevents patient revenue losses

For further info and a personal introduction, contact John Paju at john@physiciancrossroads.com or call (707) 462-1557.

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Your Best Medical Employment Database

Find the job you’re looking for by searching our growing network of specialty boards.

For Sale

Leading medical job search web site: specialist software matching medical professionals with employers; monthly newsletter sent to over 120k active subscribers. Contact John at John@physiciancrossroads.com.

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Wounded Warrior Project

Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) takes a holistic approach when serving warriors and their families to nurture the mind and body, and encourage economic empowerment and engagement. Through a high-touch and interactive approach, WWP hopes to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded service members in our nation’s history.

WWP serves veterans and service members who incurred a physical or mental injury, illness, or wound, co-incident to their military service on or after September 11, 2001 and their families. On that date, America watched in horror as approximately 3,000 people died including hundreds of firefighters and rescue workers. Many warriors note a sense of duty to volunteer for the military following these tragic events.


With advancements in battlefield medicine and body armor, an unprecedented percentage of service members are surviving severe wounds or injuries. For every US soldier killed in World Wars I and II, there were 1.7 soldiers wounded. In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, for every US soldier killed, seven are wounded. Combined, over 48,000 servicemen and women have been physically injured in the recent military conflicts.

In addition to the physical wounds, it is estimated as many as 400,000 service members live with the invisible wounds of war including combat-related stress, major depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Another 320,000 are believed to have experienced a traumatic brain injury while on deployment.

With the mission to honor and empower Wounded Warriors, WWP is the hand extended to encourage warriors as they adjust to their new normal and achieve new triumphs. Offering a variety of programs and services, WWP is equipped to serve warriors with every type of injury—from the physical to the invisible wounds of war.

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Mercy Ships Overview
Mercy Ships Overview

Watch on Vimeo

Little Income. Little Hope.

Up to 69% of citizens in Sub-Saharan African nations like Togo and Guinea live on less than $2 per day. Healthcare is simply not an option, either because it does not exist or it is completely unaffordable. In low-income countries, it is estimated that 85% of children need treatment for a surgical condition before the age of 15. Lack of treatment or a sometimes simple surgical solution often leads to complications, lifelong disability or death.

An Enormous Challenge

Globally, five billion people have no access to safe surgery. In low-income and lower-middle-income countries, nine out of ten people have no access to basic surgical care. But don’t let the statistics numb you. Because behind every number there is a name, a face, and a story. They will break your heart, but they will inspire you to take action—as Mercy Ships volunteers have for more than 35 years.

Transcending Borders. Changing Lives.

Mercy Ships began sailing on our mission to provide hope and healing to the world’s forgotten poor in 1978. Each year, we’ve been able to reach more people to provide life-changing surgeries.

In 2016, 1,551 life-changing surgeries were performed, as well 22,466 dental procedures. Over 6,900 medical consultations were made, and over 1,700 local African healthcare professional were trained. Every port brings new challenges, new successes—and new lives transformed forever.

Healing Continues Long After the Ship Departs

Mercy Ships seeks to leave the host nation better equipped with the training, tools, and infrastructure to care for their own.

Sustainable health care requires a plan. Mercy Ships Capacity-Building programs identify local needs and work closely with local governments to establish initiatives that make a lasting difference. We leave a legacy that extends for years—and even generations.

Training and Mentoring Local Professionals

Mercy Ships offers specialized training to local healthcare professionals—surgeons, nurses, doctors, dentists, ophthalmologists, midwives, and community health workers—in techniques and procedures appropriate for their environments.

Providing Medical Tools and Resources

Healthcare workers in the developing world often lack the medicine, equipment and tools necessary to deliver basic care.

The HOPE Center

When Mercy Ships arrives in port, screenings are organized throughout the country. Patients near the port can easily travel to the ship, but for others, reaching the ship is more difficult.

To reduce the need for multiple trips, Mercy Ships establishes a Hospital Out-Patient Extension (HOPE) center to provide housing for patients and caregivers near the ship. After surgery, the HOPE center offers a safe, clean environment that promotes effective recovery while maintaining easy access to the ship for follow-up care.

The HOPE center also frees bed space in the ship’s hospital ward, so we can help more people at each port of call.

Building Better Medical Facilities

Healthcare workers in the developing world often lack adequate facilities to serve their communities. Medical administrators with limited resources may have to choose between infrastructure development or maintenance and paying their workers. Collaborating with local healthcare partners, Mercy Ships provides construction and renovation services that enhance local healthcare resources.

Growing a Better Future

Mercy Ships partners with local agencies to help families and communities learn practical and natural food-producing skills that reduce malnutrition and increase food security. Improved crops and conservation-oriented farming methods result in more income and better health for the farmers, their families and their communities.

Training Local Leaders

Mercy Ships emphasizes lasting social change based on biblical principles. Community leaders, teachers and churches are encouraged to see themselves as agents of change. Conferences and workshops offer practical help on issues, community cooperation and sustainable development.

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PhysicianCrossroads.com
john@physiciancrossroads.com
P.O. Box 1547, Ukiah, CA 95482

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